Wearable Health Technology from Jupl on trial in Illawarra

The Illawarra Retirement Trust (IRT) yesterday announced that it has teamed up with Jupl, an innovative New Zealand software company, to trial the latest in wearable health technology.

Jason Malone, Chief Executive, IRT Care, says the trial is an initial pilot to test the latest in wearable healthcare technology.

“Our goal is to deliver the best quality healthcare possible. This pilot programme is the next step in delivering improved aged healthcare, by providing our residents with the latest technologies that will allow them to enjoy a better quality of life,”

said Malone.

Central to the trial is Jupl’s application running on Samsung Gear S3 Frontier smartwatches.

The Gear S3 is the first smartwatch to ship with an embedded SIM, meaning it is essentially a mobile phone and doesn’t require any other device or phone for transmitting information.

The Jupl application integrates with the Samsung watch and Cisco’s Jasper cloud service to deliver wearable healthcare technology that provides 24/7 monitoring and support for the wearer.

Gui Feijo, Jupl’s General Manager in Australia, said, “We integrated the Samsung smartwatch into our health and safety platform to provide a fully mobile solution for aged care providers such as IRT. The service will enable IRT to connect residents, who may be in an emergency situation, to IRT’s central monitoring facility at the press of a button. It also sends the wearer’s location, as well as critical health data, to IRT and/or family members through the combination of the Jupl app and web portal.”

This new healthcare technology was developed following an intensive international collaboration between Spark NZ, Samsung and Cisco Jasper, alongside New Zealand software company Jupl.

According to Jupl co-founder and CEO Alan Brannigan, international cooperation has been a key factor in the success of the project to date.

“Such a collaboration between several international partners involved thousands of hours of work, pushing the boundaries of innovation in the way technology is traditionally utilised and developed. This has provided us with a fully scalable global distribution model and is game-changing technology.”

“This solution has been made possible, in large part, by the roaming capability embedded in the M2M SIM solution provided by Spark, and managed with the IoT connectivity platform provided by Cisco Jasper,” said Brannigan.

This is the first time that the Jupl solution has been deployed in Australia. It has been available in New Zealand for some time, and is now also trialling it in the United States and South America.

 

The big bucks are in Industrial IoT

The Internet of Things continues to evolve, attempting to overcome its poor reputation for cybersecurity and making the case for wider adoption, especially by enterprises.

Consumer IoT, largely represented in smart-home automation, remains a market being targeted by Amazon, Apple, Google, LG Electronics, Samsung Electronics, and other technology titans.

The big bucks are in Industrial IoT, though. That market has attracted AT&T, IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, Verizon Communications, and hundreds of startups.

Some of those startups, such as C3 IoT and Uptake Technologies, have achieved “unicorn” status and attracted significant investments. The Chicago-based Uptake is a shining example of the industry transition from platform-as-a-service business models to software-as-a-service.

Many of the savvier startups are adding artificial intelligence and machine learning to their technology portfolios, complementing their IoT focus.

 

see full article from Semiconductor engineering here…

Smart Waste collection utilising sensors gaining traction – IoT ANZ

Although the smart waste collection technology industry is still in an early phase, Internet of Things (IoT)-enabled smart bins and sensors are slowly gaining traction in ANZ and globally.

According to a recent report by US research company Navigant, the market is expected to grow from US$57.6 million (A$77 million) in 2016 to more than US$223 million (A$300 million) in 2025, with a 16.3 per cent compound annual growth rate.

“Currently, most municipal waste collection operations focus on emptying containers according to predefined schedules,” explains Christina Jung, a Research Associate with Navigant. “This is inevitably inefficient, with half-full bins being emptied, poor use of city assets and unnecessary fleet fuel consumption.”

Jung says the smart waste collection solutions of the future will be able to track waste levels and provide route optimisation as well as operational analytics – providing new opportunities to optimise waste management: “More and more municipalities and waste service managers are realising that
these solutions can help them meet sustainability goals, improve services for residents and reduce operational costs [at the same time].”

She adds, “There is a growing awareness among city leaders of the potential benefits of multi-application approaches to the deployment of smart city infrastructure. At the heart of this transformation is IoT technology that connects a range of intelligent sensors and devices to monitor and automate city operations. Areas where technology is having the greatest impact include street lighting, public safety, traffic systems and waste collection.”

Jung’s observation comes on the back of TDC, Denmark’s largest telecoms company, and Cisco forming a partnership agreement in June 2016 to deploy a digital IoT city platform in Denmark. As part of the initiative, Dublin company SmartBin deployed its sensors to a range of waste and recycling containers that were integrated with the city’s digital platform. In addition, lamp posts and traffic lights were equipped with sensors that are able to send data to a control console at the town hall and allow real time monitoring of waste production.

A similar project took place locally in Australia 2015, when the Sunshine Coast Council partnered with Cisco and Telstra to develop the so-called Smart City Framework, a portfolio of 13 municipal service areas including waste management. Here, Enevo headed by Greg Howard and its Brisbane-based partner, Smarter Technology Solutions, saw the successful initial deployment of Enevo’s smart fill- level sensors.

“Another example of an integrated smart waste collection solutions are solar-powered waste bins equipped with Wi-Fi units,” Jung says. “While many smart city initiatives propose to provide public Wi-Fi hotspots, it can be expensive to lease areas to host the equipment. However, with Wi-Fi- enabled smart bins, cities can run access points by using the solar energy already collected by the bins.”

Leon Hayes from Solar Bins Australia has been instrumental in rolling out more BigBelly solar powered compacting bins across Australia. Melbourne has an impressive amount of bins with general waste bins sat next to recycling ones.

“Yet, despite the successful [early] deployments, there is still limited demand for smart waste collection solutions due to the lack of awareness about cost [recovery] and the effectiveness of the technology.”

Data Integration

The next phase will see sensor data pulled from dozens of different sensor manufacturers via API* into established telematics systems like that of Telogis which is a global leader in providing actionable data to waste fleet operators across the markets it operates in.

There is a huge amount of cost savings to be made through fleet optimisation and route planning. With more accurate data fleet operators can make decisions to improve efficiencies and still meet performance targets for their end clients.

Low Power Wide Area Networks

The other disruptor and ultimate enabler  will be the rollout of LPWAN connectivity across the region with Sigfox firmly leading the way in the Australian and NZ market.

LPWAN connected sensors like LoRa , Sigfox and NB-IoT allow sensors to operate on batteries for much longer periods and communicate over longer distances than traditional 3G powered devices.

Enevo has yet to transition to a LPWAN version of its sensor but companies like Solar Bins Australia and PiP IoT in Christchurch have developed versions which can then push data into 3rd party systems .

Glossary Term

*APIapplication-programming interface is a set of functions and procedures that allow the creation of applications which access the features or data of an operating system, application, or other service.

Sources and References

Enevo Oy – Finnish based Cleantech business using IoT Devices

Pip IoT – NZ based LPWAN sensor manufacturer of IoT devices

Solar Bins Australia – Australia based distributor of BigBelly and LPWAN Sensors.

Telogis – Market leading telematics provider

Waste Management Review – parts of article originally appeared earlier in 2017.

Infrastructure NZ – IoT projects need to follow the money

Infrastructure New Zealand will host the Building Nations Symposium, New Zealand’s infrastructure thought leadership event of the year, on 26-27 October 2017 at the TSB Bank Arena in Wellington, New Zealand.

Building Nations is the premier event on New Zealand’s infrastructure calendar. The two-day symposium provides the opportunity for public and private sectors to come together to lead thinking and advance best practice in national infrastructure development.

The key theme for the Symposium this year is ‘New Solutions for Infrastructure Challenges’ with the following sub-themes forming the content for the two day event.

Resilience

Water

Congestion Charging and Road Pricing

Alternative Funding

Urban Growth and Satellite Cities

Planning Law Reform

Sessions to watch from a Smart City perspective include …

Road Pricing, Managed Motorways, Congestion Charging – what’s the right solution for New Zealand?

Keynote Presentation: Singapore’s Next Generation
Electronic Road Pricing

Greater Springfield: Australia’s Fastest
Emerging Master-Planned City

Integrated Development at Scale: A Satellite City for Auckland?

Agenda can be found here … AGENDA Infrastructure 2017