Category Archives: Innovation & Technology

How to Manage a Future of Abundance

The influential economic theorist Jeremy Rifkin looks ahead to a world of virtually free energy and zero marginal cost production, and to a desperate race against climate change.

Most people in the business world are aware of …

(1) the convergence of computer and communications technology,

(2) the shift in energy from fossil fuels to renewables,

and (3) the movement toward self-driving vehicles and robot-driven manufacturing.

But only a few people are thinking intensively about how all these technological changes will fit together — along with changes in advanced manufacturing, water systems, agriculture, healthcare, and education — to generate rapid, widespread growth accompanied by a dramatic reduction in ecological footprint.

This systemic approach to the industrial future is the domain of economic theorist Jeremy Rifkin

He argues, for example, that both capitalism and the fossil fuel industries are hitting limits that stem from the laws of thermodynamics.

Investor-based capitalism, which focuses resources for immediate returns,…

will inevitably be replaced by a more distributed and streamlined network-based capitalism, alongside a sharing economy governed by a high-tech global commons.

According to Rifkin, this new hybrid economic system will be made possible through the provision of solar, wind, and other renewable energy on demand, facilitated by innovations such as the Internet of Things and blockchain.

In the world he envisions, the costs of producing and delivering an increasing array of goods and services will dwindle to near zero, and economies will have to learn to manage abundance — and the use of shared goods and services.

These shifts will happen during the next 40 years or so, he says, unless they are cut short by the exponentially increasing dangers of climate change and species extinction.

Even those who do not agree with Rifkin’s theory that capitalism is in the midst of a fundamental transformation must respect the exponential power of the forces he is tracking.

Intelligent technology, in particular, is expanding at an ever-increasing rate, lowering costs, replacing human labor, tracking human activity, and making many new things possible — which could be the “dark net” of authoritarian surveillance or a broadening of wealth and quality of life.

To read the full interview go to Strategy and Business site here.

RIFKIN: A new technological infrastructure is gradually coming together, brought on by digitization. The process began with the maturation of the communications Internet over the past 25 years.

Now this is converging with a second Internet, this one for renewable energy. It’s a new digital power grid, stretching across continents, which allows millions of people to produce their own wind and solar electricity and send their excess power generation back into the system.

Both of these Internets will converge, during the next decade, with an emerging digitized mobility Internet composed of increasingly autonomous electric and fuel-cell vehicles operated by near-zero marginal cost renewable energy on smart road, rail, water, and air systems.

These three systems will allow people to share communication, energy, and mobility partially in the capitalist market and partially in the emerging sharing economy.

Wearable Health Technology from Jupl on trial in Illawarra

The Illawarra Retirement Trust (IRT) yesterday announced that it has teamed up with Jupl, an innovative New Zealand software company, to trial the latest in wearable health technology.

Jason Malone, Chief Executive, IRT Care, says the trial is an initial pilot to test the latest in wearable healthcare technology.

“Our goal is to deliver the best quality healthcare possible. This pilot programme is the next step in delivering improved aged healthcare, by providing our residents with the latest technologies that will allow them to enjoy a better quality of life,”

said Malone.

Central to the trial is Jupl’s application running on Samsung Gear S3 Frontier smartwatches.

The Gear S3 is the first smartwatch to ship with an embedded SIM, meaning it is essentially a mobile phone and doesn’t require any other device or phone for transmitting information.

The Jupl application integrates with the Samsung watch and Cisco’s Jasper cloud service to deliver wearable healthcare technology that provides 24/7 monitoring and support for the wearer.

Gui Feijo, Jupl’s General Manager in Australia, said, “We integrated the Samsung smartwatch into our health and safety platform to provide a fully mobile solution for aged care providers such as IRT. The service will enable IRT to connect residents, who may be in an emergency situation, to IRT’s central monitoring facility at the press of a button. It also sends the wearer’s location, as well as critical health data, to IRT and/or family members through the combination of the Jupl app and web portal.”

This new healthcare technology was developed following an intensive international collaboration between Spark NZ, Samsung and Cisco Jasper, alongside New Zealand software company Jupl.

According to Jupl co-founder and CEO Alan Brannigan, international cooperation has been a key factor in the success of the project to date.

“Such a collaboration between several international partners involved thousands of hours of work, pushing the boundaries of innovation in the way technology is traditionally utilised and developed. This has provided us with a fully scalable global distribution model and is game-changing technology.”

“This solution has been made possible, in large part, by the roaming capability embedded in the M2M SIM solution provided by Spark, and managed with the IoT connectivity platform provided by Cisco Jasper,” said Brannigan.

This is the first time that the Jupl solution has been deployed in Australia. It has been available in New Zealand for some time, and is now also trialling it in the United States and South America.

 

The big bucks are in Industrial IoT

The Internet of Things continues to evolve, attempting to overcome its poor reputation for cybersecurity and making the case for wider adoption, especially by enterprises.

Consumer IoT, largely represented in smart-home automation, remains a market being targeted by Amazon, Apple, Google, LG Electronics, Samsung Electronics, and other technology titans.

The big bucks are in Industrial IoT, though. That market has attracted AT&T, IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, Verizon Communications, and hundreds of startups.

Some of those startups, such as C3 IoT and Uptake Technologies, have achieved “unicorn” status and attracted significant investments. The Chicago-based Uptake is a shining example of the industry transition from platform-as-a-service business models to software-as-a-service.

Many of the savvier startups are adding artificial intelligence and machine learning to their technology portfolios, complementing their IoT focus.

 

see full article from Semiconductor engineering here…

Smart Waste collection utilising sensors gaining traction – IoT ANZ

Although the smart waste collection technology industry is still in an early phase, Internet of Things (IoT)-enabled smart bins and sensors are slowly gaining traction in ANZ and globally.

According to a recent report by US research company Navigant, the market is expected to grow from US$57.6 million (A$77 million) in 2016 to more than US$223 million (A$300 million) in 2025, with a 16.3 per cent compound annual growth rate.

“Currently, most municipal waste collection operations focus on emptying containers according to predefined schedules,” explains Christina Jung, a Research Associate with Navigant. “This is inevitably inefficient, with half-full bins being emptied, poor use of city assets and unnecessary fleet fuel consumption.”

Jung says the smart waste collection solutions of the future will be able to track waste levels and provide route optimisation as well as operational analytics – providing new opportunities to optimise waste management: “More and more municipalities and waste service managers are realising that
these solutions can help them meet sustainability goals, improve services for residents and reduce operational costs [at the same time].”

She adds, “There is a growing awareness among city leaders of the potential benefits of multi-application approaches to the deployment of smart city infrastructure. At the heart of this transformation is IoT technology that connects a range of intelligent sensors and devices to monitor and automate city operations. Areas where technology is having the greatest impact include street lighting, public safety, traffic systems and waste collection.”

Jung’s observation comes on the back of TDC, Denmark’s largest telecoms company, and Cisco forming a partnership agreement in June 2016 to deploy a digital IoT city platform in Denmark. As part of the initiative, Dublin company SmartBin deployed its sensors to a range of waste and recycling containers that were integrated with the city’s digital platform. In addition, lamp posts and traffic lights were equipped with sensors that are able to send data to a control console at the town hall and allow real time monitoring of waste production.

A similar project took place locally in Australia 2015, when the Sunshine Coast Council partnered with Cisco and Telstra to develop the so-called Smart City Framework, a portfolio of 13 municipal service areas including waste management. Here, Enevo headed by Greg Howard and its Brisbane-based partner, Smarter Technology Solutions, saw the successful initial deployment of Enevo’s smart fill- level sensors.

“Another example of an integrated smart waste collection solutions are solar-powered waste bins equipped with Wi-Fi units,” Jung says. “While many smart city initiatives propose to provide public Wi-Fi hotspots, it can be expensive to lease areas to host the equipment. However, with Wi-Fi- enabled smart bins, cities can run access points by using the solar energy already collected by the bins.”

Leon Hayes from Solar Bins Australia has been instrumental in rolling out more BigBelly solar powered compacting bins across Australia. Melbourne has an impressive amount of bins with general waste bins sat next to recycling ones.

“Yet, despite the successful [early] deployments, there is still limited demand for smart waste collection solutions due to the lack of awareness about cost [recovery] and the effectiveness of the technology.”

Data Integration

The next phase will see sensor data pulled from dozens of different sensor manufacturers via API* into established telematics systems like that of Telogis which is a global leader in providing actionable data to waste fleet operators across the markets it operates in.

There is a huge amount of cost savings to be made through fleet optimisation and route planning. With more accurate data fleet operators can make decisions to improve efficiencies and still meet performance targets for their end clients.

Low Power Wide Area Networks

The other disruptor and ultimate enabler  will be the rollout of LPWAN connectivity across the region with Sigfox firmly leading the way in the Australian and NZ market.

LPWAN connected sensors like LoRa , Sigfox and NB-IoT allow sensors to operate on batteries for much longer periods and communicate over longer distances than traditional 3G powered devices.

Enevo has yet to transition to a LPWAN version of its sensor but companies like Solar Bins Australia and PiP IoT in Christchurch have developed versions which can then push data into 3rd party systems .

Glossary Term

*APIapplication-programming interface is a set of functions and procedures that allow the creation of applications which access the features or data of an operating system, application, or other service.

Sources and References

Enevo Oy – Finnish based Cleantech business using IoT Devices

Pip IoT – NZ based LPWAN sensor manufacturer of IoT devices

Solar Bins Australia – Australia based distributor of BigBelly and LPWAN Sensors.

Telogis – Market leading telematics provider

Waste Management Review – parts of article originally appeared earlier in 2017.

Infrastructure NZ – IoT projects need to follow the money

Infrastructure New Zealand will host the Building Nations Symposium, New Zealand’s infrastructure thought leadership event of the year, on 26-27 October 2017 at the TSB Bank Arena in Wellington, New Zealand.

Building Nations is the premier event on New Zealand’s infrastructure calendar. The two-day symposium provides the opportunity for public and private sectors to come together to lead thinking and advance best practice in national infrastructure development.

The key theme for the Symposium this year is ‘New Solutions for Infrastructure Challenges’ with the following sub-themes forming the content for the two day event.

Resilience

Water

Congestion Charging and Road Pricing

Alternative Funding

Urban Growth and Satellite Cities

Planning Law Reform

Sessions to watch from a Smart City perspective include …

Road Pricing, Managed Motorways, Congestion Charging – what’s the right solution for New Zealand?

Keynote Presentation: Singapore’s Next Generation
Electronic Road Pricing

Greater Springfield: Australia’s Fastest
Emerging Master-Planned City

Integrated Development at Scale: A Satellite City for Auckland?

Agenda can be found here … AGENDA Infrastructure 2017

IOF2020 The Internet of Food & Farm

 

The Internet of Food & Farm (IoF2020) consortium has been selected for a large subsidy from the European Commission to investigate and foster a large-scale implementation of Internet of Things (IoT) in the European farming and food domain.

IoT is a powerful driver that has the potential to transform the entire farming and food domain into smart webs of connected objects that are context-sensitive and can be identified, sensed and controlled remotely.
IoF2020 consists of 73 partners from 16 countries and is coordinated by Wageningen UR. The project builds around 5 trials, in the areas of fruit, vegetables, meat, arable and dairy, with 19 use cases.

In these use cases technology readiness levels of IoT technologies will be upgraded, whilst at the same time building a societal ecosystem to improve take-up of these technologies.
The subsidy is part of the prestigious Innovation action: Large Scale Pilots (Internet of Things) and further builds on results of the AgriFood projects in the EU FIWARE program. IoF2020 started 1 January 2017 and will run 4 years.

Fighting Food Insecurity, Waste, and Unsustainable Food Systems

The Good Kitchen, launched last year as Europe’s first accelerator program for social startup businesses tackling food insecurity and food poverty issues, has selected its first five enterprises from an initial intake of more than 100 applicants.

The program offers low-interest loans up to a maximum of €75,000 ($84,000) per business, alongside social investment, business support, access to key markets and mentorship.

London-based The Good Kitchen selected its first five ‘winners’ on the basis that they each offer “highly scalable and sustainable solutions that can reshape our food system and help everyone, everywhere, eat an adequate, healthy and sustainable diet.”

The successful five startups are Bump Mark, a Uk startup developing food freshness checker; Cultivando Futuro, a Colombian agro-commerce platform for smallholder farmers; Entocycle, a UK animal feed developer growing insects with ‘up-cycled’ food waste; Fazla Gida, a Turkish online platform that gives supermarkets a quick, easy and profitable way to offer unsold products online to food banks and humanitarian organisations; and Make Kit, a UK project that provides people with affordable and conveniently distributed recipe kits.

Core funding for Good Kitchen is provided by the UK charity, KellyDeli Foundation. The foundation receives 1% of the profits generated by the KellyDeli business, which is a handmade sushi kiosk business in Europe. Other individuals and businesses, including some from the food sector, who believe in the need to tackle food security and food poverty concerns, have also contributed to the program.

The program’s total first-year investment is estimated to be €250,000, made up of individual loans ranging from €30,000 to €60,000, plus the provision of zero-fee support to the successful applicants. A second program call is scheduled for early next year, although it could take place sooner if sufficient additional funding becomes available.

Loans, advanced on a ‘patient capital’ basis, typically charge 1% APR with repayment to be made over no more than five years. In the positive case of a supported business advancing to its own Series A funding round, it would be expected that the program loan would be repaid immediately.

“We won’t be taking an equity stake in any of the businesses attached to the program,” Joseph Gridley, head of the KellyDeli Foundation, told AgFunderNews. “Because this is a development where social impact comes first, we believe that ideas are the best way to change the world, not organizations. In that context, we also believe it’s important to allow ideas to spread as rapidly as possible, reasoning that if we had an equity stake in these businesses we might, in some way, slow down their rate of growth.”

Good Kitchen opened its first call for applications in February this year, reducing the 100 responses it received to a short-list of 19 real contenders before putting each applicant through a venture capital-style assessment. These survivors were also subjected to detailed examination by a ‘jury’ of 15 specialists, including investment bankers and food sector executives.

“In assessing all the main contenders, we were looking for organizations that had objective proof their solution was capable of delivering social impact related to food security or food poverty,” said Gridley.

“We wanted to find enterprises with a sustainable and strong business model, with traction either in terms of revenue or predicted sales, driven by a great team in which we could place our trust. It was also important that the market opportunity for each selected project, product or service was big enough for it to make a big impact on the food security and food poverty issues on which we are focused.”

Commenting that 30 of the original applications were ‘terrible,’ followed by 30 that could be termed ‘good,’ Gridley said selecting a winning five from about 40 ‘very good’ projects and ideas, was a tough task. Even at the end of the process, at least five potentially supportable enterprises had to be turned away.

“We decided to start small in our first year with the aim of discovering how best to help social businesses achieve their potential,” he said. “Maybe in the future we’ll be able to work with an increased number each year.”

Gridley is very positive about the chosen five. Here are some of his comments on each:

Bump Mark (UK): “The information we use to decide when to throw food away is inaccurate. Conservative expiry dates cost retailers tremendous amounts as they throw away up to 16% of their stock on short-life products. Bump Mark is a food freshness checker that reacts to the environment around it, just like fresh food does and updates itself. The label is checked by touch; when it’s smooth – your food is fresh. If you feel bumps – then it’s time to bin. The label only goes ‘bad’ when your food does too.”

Cultivando Futuro (Colombia): “The team behind Cultivando Futuro traveled thousands of miles across Colombia listening to the stories of farmers, and learning about where the industry isn’t working in their favor. This led them to create the first agro-commerce platform, which improves the efficiency of the food supply chain by connecting all the key actors, opens up new channels for direct trading to farmers so that they can gain access to better market opportunities, and guides the industry through big data analysis and open data visualization.”

Entocycle (UK): “The current farming system is heavily reliant on protein from dwindling fish stocks and land intensive soya to produce the animals we humans eat. Entocycle is harnessing 150 million years of nature’s research and development to produce a solution to feeding the world. They believe that insect protein is the future of farming and are using the Black Soldier Fly to ‘up-cycle’ organic food waste into a sustainable protein feed alternative for aquaculture and livestock, and simultaneously surpassing current waste processing alternatives.”

Fazla Gida (Turkey): “Food waste is a cost not only for producers but also for warehouses, logistics operators and food waste solution providers. To prevent catastrophic levels of food waste, the Turkish government offers a 100% tax deduction incentive to companies donating surplus foods. Through its donation platform, Fazla Gida takes into account the economic, ethical and environmental issues around food waste, and provides professionals in the food industry with the opportunity to offer their unsold but safe-to-eat products online to food banks. Its process also helps food companies to claim their 100% tax deductions, with 50% of the value gained being passed back to Fazla Gida.”

Make Kit (UK): “In the UK, approximately a third of children are obese or overweight by the time they leave primary school. The problem worsens for people from lower socio-economic backgrounds. Make Kit creates recipe kits, which are partly subsidized, making them affordable for people on a tight budget. They are also building on recipes created for and by the local community and sold at accessible locations such as community centers, doctor surgeries, nurseries, community cooking events, and in areas with high levels of obesity and health inequality.”

NZ Hi-Tech Award Winners 2017

Frances Valintine inducted into Hall of Fame.

The 2017 NZ Hi-Tech Award winners are:

2017 Flying Kiwi and inductee into the Tait Communications Hi-Tech Hall of Fame
Frances Valintine

Xero Hi-Tech Young Achiever Award
Winner: Aliesha Staples
Highly commended: Kendall Flutey

Qual IT Best Hi-Tech Solution for the Public Sector Award
Winner: Orion Health & HealthOne

IBM Innovative Company of the year Award
Winner: Pushpay

ATEED Best Hi-Tech Solution for the Creative Sector Award
Winner: Shotover Camera Systems

Callaghan Innovation Hi-Tech Maori Innovation Award
Winner: Biolytix

Duncan Cotterill Most Innovative Hi-Tech Software Product Award
Winner: RedShield Security

Endace Most Innovative Hi-Tech Hardware Product Award
Winner: Adherium

Kiwibank Most Innovative Hi-Tech Services Award
Winner: RedShield Security Highly commended: Navilluso Medical

NZTE Best Hi-Tech Solution for the Agritech Sector Award
Winner: Compac

Quick Circuit Most Innovative Hi-Tech Mobile Award
Winner: oDocs EyeCare

New Zealand Venture Investment Fund Hi-Tech Start-up Company of the Year
Winner: Latipay

Coretex Hi-Tech Emerging Company of the Year
Winner: Timely

PwC NZ Hi-Tech Company of the Year Award
Winner: Pushpay

The NZ Hi-Tech Awards
Now in its 23rd year, the New Zealand Hi-Tech Awards celebrate the success of our producers of goods and services from the software, electronics, telecommunications, mobile, agritech, creative and other hi-tech industries.

The Awards are run by the NZ Hi-Tech Trust, a not-for-profit organisation that supports and promotes the wider industry.

The board is made up of ten trustees: Bennett Medary, Vaughan Rowsell and Erin Wanbrough in Auckland, chair Wayne Norrie, John Fokerd, Kirsty Godfrey-Billy and Jennifer Rutherford in Wellington and South Island-based Owen Scott, Helen Shorthouse and Ian Taylor.

Autonomous Vehicles deployed by 2021

While many AV manufacturers have put an expected deployment rollout around 2021, in order for cities to prepare themselves for this short window, precautions must be taken now.

The report breaks down six major questions, framed as “who, what, when, where, how and why,” that circle the conclusion that autonomous vehicles in their many forms are coming, the only real question is whether cities will be prepared in time.

The report compiled six keys for cities insights for city officials to know about the future of AV integration on city streets.

1. The Window for Action is Closing: Although they may seem like a distant technology, when economies of scale begin to kick in, or the proportionate cost savings is gained by an increased level of production, this technology could rapidly expand. The report predicts that when costs for AVs fall, they will spread more rapidly than traditional automobiles did in the 20th century.

2. AV Deployment Makes Sense in Cities: Cities by their very nature consist of dense populations living and working in a limited geographical space. Traditional vehicles, due to their bulky and often oversized nature, do not often mix with the finite space available. Autonomous vehicles could reduce the need for parking spaces and garages, minimize lane spacing and open up more living space for residents.

3. Highway Testing is So Passé: According to the report, most testing in the AV space has been done on high-speed highways — but this is already obsolete. The greatest impact, and largest market available, will be in revolutionizing intra-city mobility.

4. Change in Mobility Driven by Aging Population: In less than 15 years, the world will have more than 1.4 billion people over the age of 60. While mobility options lessen with aging, autonomous vehicles could keep the elderly moving and more independent.

5. Cities can Leverage Power over Developers: Because the emerging market is brand new, cities have the opportunity to set the rules — if they act quickly. Cities can shape markets to focus private-sector attention and investment on the needs of cities and underserved populations.

6.Cities are Just One Piece of the Puzzle: The best case scenario for the implementation of automated vehicles include reduced congestion, elimination of human-caused crashes, increased mobility and more space devoted to public spaces, among many others. In order to maximize the good and minimize the bad, according to the report, cities must tap all stakeholders and keep them involved. Such a complete transformation of the transportation system will need help from experts across all levels of government, academia, and the private and nonprofit sectors.

Bloomberg Philanthropies is working with the Aspen Institute to bring mayors and senior leaders from several cities together with leading industry and policy experts to help cities explore the questions and hopefully come up with workable solutions.

The Industrial IoT Stack – GE , IBM and Cisco challenged by the newcomers

Snippet from CB Insights – With connected devices like Nest and Sonos breaking into the mainstream, the IoT has become one of the most-discussed tech trends of the last twenty years.

But the IoT extends well beyond the home and consumer-level gadgets. Asset-heavy industries like manufacturing, logistics, mining, oil, utilities and agriculture have also begun to apply IoT systems to improve efficiency and results.

With machines and specialized sensors collecting data at every step of production, the potential gains from the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) are enormous.

Just in 2016 alone, startups bringing digitization to industry saw more than $2.2B of investment.

The category breakdown is as follows:

  • Sensors & Connectivity

    • Connectivity — wireless network providers like SigFox and Ingenu act as the telecoms for the IoT age. Most companies here provide LPWAN (low-power wide area network) connectivity, which is popular radio band for IoT devices because existing cellular systems aren’t power- and bandwidth-efficient enough for systems sending small packets of data. Some, like Senet use the LoRaWAN spectrum, and others like SigFox work with ultra-narrowband specifically for low-power devices. 

    • Sensors & Monitoring — some companies in this area are solely sensor or system on chip (SoC) makers like Ineda Systems, but the category also includes more “full stack” (but industry agnostic) sensor and monitoring platforms like SamsaraHelium, and Electric Imp.

    • M2M / Satellite — sometimes Industrial IoT assets operate in rural and less connected parts of the world. Satellites can be a more effective way for sensors to transmit data, and companies like Kepler Communications offer a space-based communication network. With similar advantages in isolated industrial environments, machine-to-machine (M2M) communication is a more decentralized way to pass information between devices, and companies like Filament are applying blockchain architecture to do so with low-power industrial sensors.

  • Edge Devices & Connected Objects

    • Inspection Drones — startups offering drone hardware or image analysis services for industrial inspection. Some startups like Skycatch have individual use cases, such as construction. Recently, drone makers famous for their consumer drones like 3D Robotics have moved into the inspection space. While it’s mostly aerial drones for now, the category encompasses all types including underwater drones and pipe inspecting drones such as those made by RedZone Robotics.

    • 3D Printing — leveraging materials science and robotics, companies like Desktop Metal and Carbon 3D are bringing the customization benefits of 3D printing to an industrial scale. 3D printing tech is starting to go beyond just prototyping tools to being production-scale for making parts, which is why corporate venture arms of GE and BMW are investing here.

    • Industrial AR/VR — headsets and mobile AR specifically tailored for industrial settings and field service. Daqri and Atheer are well-funded headset makers that focus on enterprise and industrial settings. Others like Scope AR do similar work in field service using mobile and tablets, employing AR to highlight parts on industrial equipment while connected to support experts in real-time.
    • Wearables — IoT sensors worn on the body in industrial environments. Strong Arm Technologies makes a safety wearable and some industrial smartglass makers like Ubimax and Upskill also have wearables offerings.
    • Robotics & Exo — industrial automation robots along with exoskeletons that augment human abilities. Companies like Rethink and Righthand Robotics both make the classic arm-shaped industrial robots for manufacturing. Clearpath Robotics does warehouse robotics, as well as a host of ruggedized ground and sea-faring drones. And companies like Kindred and Sarcos are developing worker exoskeletons that can help handle heavy materials or be remotely operated for inspections.
  • Universal Platforms & Edge Intelligence
    • Universal Platforms — cloud vendors here commonly market themselves as general platform-as-a-service (PaaS) companies that allow other IoT and IIoT companies to manage and maintain the capture of data from their device networks. This includes the mostly industry-agnostic platforms like C3 IoT and Altizon that do cloud analytics for industrial companies.

    • Fog & Edge Computing — computing done at the “edge” or closer to the sensor is a trending shift occurring within the IIoT architecture. Companies like Saguna Networks do edge computing (close to the point of collection), whereas a company like Foghorn Systems does fog computing (think a lower-hanging cloud that’s done on-site like a LAN). Both methods allow mission-critical devices to operate safely without latency of transmitting all data to a cloud, which can also save big on bandwidth.

  • Applied Sensor Networks
    • Fleet — sensor networks and solutions for connected trucking fleets. Companies like Veniam are focused on the connectivity aspect, where others like Vnomics sell optimization and vehicle monitoring technology.
    • Oil & Gas —  companies using connected sensor networks in the oil industry include GroundMetrics (locating wells), Tachyus (extracting oil and gas), and Aptomar (spill safety).
    • Agriculture — companies like Blue River Technology and Farmbot are bringing robotics to agriculture. Others like Farmers Edge and Terravion are about capturing and analyzing farm data and tractor telematics for more efficient production.
    • Smart Grid – startups in this area develop tech that enables more efficient distribution of electricity, gas and water, and often market to utility companies. TrilliantTendril, and BluePillar are smart-meter enabled solutions for utilities and large enterprises to manage usage and reporting.
    • Factory — Eigen Innovations and the companies in this category are more vertical-specific platforms for manufacturing analytics. Eigen, for example, uses video and sensor data on factory floors to ensure process and quality control.
    • Warehouse — robotic movers and RFID sensor systems that target the warehouse. Fetch Robotics, for example, does material transport on warehouse floors. Alien Technologies, one of the most well-funded startups in all of IoT, does RFID tagging tech for the supply chain.
  • Advanced Analytics, Edge Intelligence & Protection
    • AI, ML, Predictive Analytics — software that allows companies to find insights and derive predictive analytics such as when machines will need maintenance. Most companies in the category are like Maana and work by applying AI to mining machine data, but others, like Augury Systems, offer a full sensor suite that detects machine anomalies and offers predictive analytics.
    • Cybersecurity — companies in this category develop cybersecurity solutions for IIoT and industrial control systems (ICS) in heavy industry. The IIoT has already suffered serious hacks; a German steel mill suffered “massive damages” after hackers accessed a blast furnace that workers could not properly shut down. Bastille Networks is one company that focuses on protecting the wireless transmission of IoT and RFID devices, and Claroty is a well-funded company working on protecting industrial control systems.

Full article – can be found here