Category Archives: New Zealand

ERoad – Latest figures – US expansion

Eroad – September 2017 numbers.

EROAD HALF YEAR 2018 ANNOUNCEMENT AND UPDATE

Integrated technology, and services provider EROAD Limited says it has enjoyed record sales growth in both its foundation New Zealand market and its growing North American market.

Highlights for 6 months to September 2017 and business update

  • Revenue at $20.9 million up by 35% over same period last year
  • EBITDA of $4.0 million during the period underpinned by EBITDA of the New Zealand/Australia business which reached $11.1 million during the period
  • Net Loss before tax $3.7 million, driven by investment in US sales activity
  • Total Contracted Units in New Zealand/Australia 49,802 up by 31% since September 2016
  • Total Contracted Units in North America 9,736 up by over 84% since September 2016
  • Q1 and Q2 of FY18 were both record sales quarters for the New Zealand and North American markets
  • Customer Retention Rate remains strong at 98%
  • Future Contracted Income grew to $75 million during the period up $17m or 29% in 6 months
  • Secured new credit facility from the BNZ totaling $33.4 million for initial term of 12 months with initial drawdown in July 2017. Post September 2017, EROAD has subsequently signed a credit approved facility letter with the BNZ to further extend its facilities by approximately $16 million, to further support expected growth
  • Strong momentum has continued in the business with total contracted units increasing in October 2017 by 1,133 units for the New Zealand/Australia business and 1,166 units for the North American business
  • As part of EROAD’s continuing focus on growth in the US, EROAD has engaged First NZ Capital to undertake a strategic review of its North American business. The review is focused on evaluating options to further capture the compelling growth opportunity in North America.

Operational summary

New Zealand & Australia

EROAD’s New Zealand business enjoyed two record sales quarters during the six months to September 2017, and finished the period with a strong pipeline of demand for the second half of FY18.

Chief Executive Steven Newman said health and safety services, such as driver behaviour, are now as strong a driver of sales as electronic Road User Charges (eRUC) services, which continue to grow well. The company continues to engage with an ever more diverse range of large and small customers as fleet owners and managers begin to appreciate the positive business outcomes that can be achieved by ensuring safety within their businesses.

Mr Newman said, ‘Our customers are improving health and safety thanks to services that support safer driver behaviour. And road planners and policy makers now have high quality network data from the activity of around 50,000 vehicles on our platform. Road transport accounts for around 15% of fuel used in New Zealand, and our customers are achieving, on average, fuel savings of around six per cent, representing a significant cost saving and carbon saving to the economy.’

Mr Newman said he was particularly pleased that two of New Zealand’s leading companies, Fulton Hogan and Waste Management, had invested in new, sophisticated EROAD in-vehicle technology, with ~4,500 Ehubo2 units being installed in their transport fleets to further improve their management of health and safety.

In 2009 EROAD introduced the world’s first nationwide electronic road user charging (eRUC) system in New Zealand. Currently half of all heavy transport RUC is collected electronically, representing a rapid transition to e-commerce on a voluntary, industry-led basis, due to the cost-savings and benefits to customers.

Internet of Things (IoT) revolution continues across ANZ

The Internet of Things (IoT) revolution is here, and it’s not going anywhere anytime soon. Gartner has predicted that an estimated 25 billion connected things will be in use by 2020. According to BCG, this will mean $267 billion will be spent on IOT technologies, products and services. To put this staggering growth in another perspective, IoT sensors and devices are expected to exceed mobile phones as the largest category of connected devices in 2018.

Harnessing the power of the IoT will be crucial to future success. Sixty-five percent of 1000 global business executives surveyed say they agree that organisations that leverage IoT will have a significant advantage. But 19% still say they have never heard of it. Put yourself in a position to take advantage of the IoT with this primer on the latest trends and applications.

The current state of IoT

The Internet of Things had existed before you had probably even heard of the term. In 2008 there were already more “things” connected to the Internet than there were people. By 2015, IoT market size was up to $900 million, and this is expected to grow to $3.7 billion by 2020.

Virtually every sector has started harnessing the power of the IoT. Adoption rates vary, but significant results are being achieved in manufacturing, distribution, logistics and marketing. Currently, most “smart” devices aren’t in your home or your phone. They are in factories and offices. But smart homes will become an increasingly significant part of the industry over the next few years. It’s estimated that by 2019, 1.9 billion connected home devices totalling around $490 billion in revenue will be shipped to consumers.

Don’t be fooled into thinking the rate of growth is going to slow anytime soon. Only 0.06% of things that could be connected to the internet actually are. That means just 10 billion of the 1.5 trillion things that currently exist are connected—leaving plenty of room for new IoT innovations.

The latest trends in IoT

As adoption of IoT continues to surge, a handful of trends have begun emerging that will shape the industry in 2017 and beyond. Below are six trends you should be watching out for.

  • Businesses will deliver more services: Expect services, not products, to become the main revenue streams of companies in the IoT industry. Products will become a way of introducing consumers to the broader (and more lucrative) service.
  • Cities will get smarter: In the same way that smart technology is improving homes, expect smart systems such as street lights, parking machines and public transport to provide safer, more cost-effective solutions to cities.
  • Voice commands will dominate: We are already seeing the popularity of Amazon’s Echo, and Google and Microsoft are also developing speech-activated virtual assistants. Expect even more focus on audio commands to occur in 2017.
  • Security will improve, but so will attacks: The question of security will become more prominent as attacks on connected devices grow. Security will improve, but so will the number of data breaches.
  • Smart homes will become the standard: The adoption rate of smart home technology hasn’t been substantial, but expect growth to quicken as products such as the Echo increase in popularity.
  • Global corporations will dominate: Corporate giants such as Samsung, Google and Intel will dominate every aspect of the IoT, either by buying up specialised companies or through their own research departments.

The global B2B opportunity of IoT

The IoT will create the biggest opportunities for business to business applications. This is despite coverage of IoT  focusing on consumer products. According to research by McKinsey Global Institute, nearly $4 trillion worth of economic value could be generated by 2025 from B2B activity (factories, offices and agriculture) alone.

B2B opportunities will also be far greater in the developing world than other aspects of IoT. Advanced nations can expect to gain over 60% of the economic impact of IoT on average. This will be even more disproportionate in some settings such as homes, where advanced economies can expect over three-quarters of the economic impact. But because most of the economies of developing countries focus on manufacturing, they will be hotbeds for IoT adoption. As a result, the benefits of IoT will be shared much more equally between advanced and developing economies.

The key benefits of IoT for leaders

As with any other form of revolutionary technology, the IoT offers a wealth of benefits for those leaders who can harness its power.

  • Innovative business models: A wealth of user data will give rise to innovative new business models that have the potential to completely change market shares. It is already happening in the form of app-based transport-as-a-service providers such as Uber. As companies are better able to track how and where consumers are interacting with their products these new revenue streams will become even more proliferate.
  • Optimised operations: Smart devices can learn and improve operations in a way that humans can’t. Integrated sensors will capture data that can be used to improve efficiency and predict when maintenance issues may arise.
  • Improved inventory tracking and management: Smart devices will allow businesses the opportunity to completely automate inventory management; allowing staff time to focus on more demanding tasks.
  • More connected remote workers: If every device in an organisation is connected to the same network, employees will be able to work remotely like never before. Tasks that previously had to be completed in person, such as machine operations, will now be possible from anywhere in the world.

Essential IoT skills

Leveraging the power of IoT requires a highly specialised and in-demand skill set. Hiring the right talent will be key to your success. But you’ll also need to cultivate your enterprise’s culture in order to remain on the cutting edge of this constantly evolving industry.  Here are the essential IoT skills that you need to add to your team.

  • Security engineering: The more connected your business becomes, the more at-risk you are to cyber attacks. Data breaches have become increasingly common, and consumer awareness of data security is growing every day. A talented cyber security team is crucial to protect yours and your customer’s data.
  • Big data analysts: As the wealth of available data grows, data scientists are in increasingly high demand. The rate at which your company can pivot and improve will depend on how well you can analyse big data.
  • Machine learning: The smarter your products and systems are, the more likely you are to succeed. Hire data scientists who can create machine learning algorithms that will help devices make predictions and take action as a result of pattern identification.
  • Circuit design: Computer chip design and development will need to be adapted as smart devices gain new capabilities. Being able to create increasingly complex circuit boards more efficiently gives businesses a much-needed advantage.

Key challenges of IoT

Executives won’t be surprised to hear that this level of technological change is not without hurdles. How you react to and overcome these challenges will determine the success of your business.

Organisational alignment

To succeed on a global scale, organisations will need to completely rethink company structure and job roles. IT will no longer be a department; it will be a role that spans the entire organisation. Intra-departmental collaboration will need to be encouraged as big data connects sales, marketing and logistics more tightly than ever.

Interoperability

In the same way that teams will need to change how they work together, devices will also need to communicate more efficiently to realise the full benefits that IoT offers. Increased interoperability between devices has the potential to add $4 trillion to the economy. But the vast majority of “smart” devices used at the moment only communicate with the manufacturer. It’s estimated that 40-60% of the IoT’s total economic value won’t be realised until interoperability is improved.

Security

Greater connectivity exposes businesses to extremely high risks of cyber attacks. Everyone of a business’ millions of connected devices and sensors is a potential entry point for hackers, and one attack can bring down an entire company. But it’s not just break-ins that executives need to be concerned about. Risk from the black market of fake sensors and video data could be worth more than $5 billion by 2020. Cybersecurity is currently less than 1% of the total security budget for enterprises. This will need to increase significantly in the future.

IoT has the power to transform industries and revolutionise the way businesses use data. The ability to harness IoT’s opportunities will give global leaders an enormous competitive advantage. But leaders need to cultivate the right set of skills within their team, and a data-driven mindset, to transform this opportunity into reality.

NZ Hi-Tech Award Winners 2017

Frances Valintine inducted into Hall of Fame.

The 2017 NZ Hi-Tech Award winners are:

2017 Flying Kiwi and inductee into the Tait Communications Hi-Tech Hall of Fame
Frances Valintine

Xero Hi-Tech Young Achiever Award
Winner: Aliesha Staples
Highly commended: Kendall Flutey

Qual IT Best Hi-Tech Solution for the Public Sector Award
Winner: Orion Health & HealthOne

IBM Innovative Company of the year Award
Winner: Pushpay

ATEED Best Hi-Tech Solution for the Creative Sector Award
Winner: Shotover Camera Systems

Callaghan Innovation Hi-Tech Maori Innovation Award
Winner: Biolytix

Duncan Cotterill Most Innovative Hi-Tech Software Product Award
Winner: RedShield Security

Endace Most Innovative Hi-Tech Hardware Product Award
Winner: Adherium

Kiwibank Most Innovative Hi-Tech Services Award
Winner: RedShield Security Highly commended: Navilluso Medical

NZTE Best Hi-Tech Solution for the Agritech Sector Award
Winner: Compac

Quick Circuit Most Innovative Hi-Tech Mobile Award
Winner: oDocs EyeCare

New Zealand Venture Investment Fund Hi-Tech Start-up Company of the Year
Winner: Latipay

Coretex Hi-Tech Emerging Company of the Year
Winner: Timely

PwC NZ Hi-Tech Company of the Year Award
Winner: Pushpay

The NZ Hi-Tech Awards
Now in its 23rd year, the New Zealand Hi-Tech Awards celebrate the success of our producers of goods and services from the software, electronics, telecommunications, mobile, agritech, creative and other hi-tech industries.

The Awards are run by the NZ Hi-Tech Trust, a not-for-profit organisation that supports and promotes the wider industry.

The board is made up of ten trustees: Bennett Medary, Vaughan Rowsell and Erin Wanbrough in Auckland, chair Wayne Norrie, John Fokerd, Kirsty Godfrey-Billy and Jennifer Rutherford in Wellington and South Island-based Owen Scott, Helen Shorthouse and Ian Taylor.

The Industrial IoT Stack – GE , IBM and Cisco challenged by the newcomers

Snippet from CB Insights – With connected devices like Nest and Sonos breaking into the mainstream, the IoT has become one of the most-discussed tech trends of the last twenty years.

But the IoT extends well beyond the home and consumer-level gadgets. Asset-heavy industries like manufacturing, logistics, mining, oil, utilities and agriculture have also begun to apply IoT systems to improve efficiency and results.

With machines and specialized sensors collecting data at every step of production, the potential gains from the Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) are enormous.

Just in 2016 alone, startups bringing digitization to industry saw more than $2.2B of investment.

The category breakdown is as follows:

  • Sensors & Connectivity

    • Connectivity — wireless network providers like SigFox and Ingenu act as the telecoms for the IoT age. Most companies here provide LPWAN (low-power wide area network) connectivity, which is popular radio band for IoT devices because existing cellular systems aren’t power- and bandwidth-efficient enough for systems sending small packets of data. Some, like Senet use the LoRaWAN spectrum, and others like SigFox work with ultra-narrowband specifically for low-power devices. 

    • Sensors & Monitoring — some companies in this area are solely sensor or system on chip (SoC) makers like Ineda Systems, but the category also includes more “full stack” (but industry agnostic) sensor and monitoring platforms like SamsaraHelium, and Electric Imp.

    • M2M / Satellite — sometimes Industrial IoT assets operate in rural and less connected parts of the world. Satellites can be a more effective way for sensors to transmit data, and companies like Kepler Communications offer a space-based communication network. With similar advantages in isolated industrial environments, machine-to-machine (M2M) communication is a more decentralized way to pass information between devices, and companies like Filament are applying blockchain architecture to do so with low-power industrial sensors.

  • Edge Devices & Connected Objects

    • Inspection Drones — startups offering drone hardware or image analysis services for industrial inspection. Some startups like Skycatch have individual use cases, such as construction. Recently, drone makers famous for their consumer drones like 3D Robotics have moved into the inspection space. While it’s mostly aerial drones for now, the category encompasses all types including underwater drones and pipe inspecting drones such as those made by RedZone Robotics.

    • 3D Printing — leveraging materials science and robotics, companies like Desktop Metal and Carbon 3D are bringing the customization benefits of 3D printing to an industrial scale. 3D printing tech is starting to go beyond just prototyping tools to being production-scale for making parts, which is why corporate venture arms of GE and BMW are investing here.

    • Industrial AR/VR — headsets and mobile AR specifically tailored for industrial settings and field service. Daqri and Atheer are well-funded headset makers that focus on enterprise and industrial settings. Others like Scope AR do similar work in field service using mobile and tablets, employing AR to highlight parts on industrial equipment while connected to support experts in real-time.
    • Wearables — IoT sensors worn on the body in industrial environments. Strong Arm Technologies makes a safety wearable and some industrial smartglass makers like Ubimax and Upskill also have wearables offerings.
    • Robotics & Exo — industrial automation robots along with exoskeletons that augment human abilities. Companies like Rethink and Righthand Robotics both make the classic arm-shaped industrial robots for manufacturing. Clearpath Robotics does warehouse robotics, as well as a host of ruggedized ground and sea-faring drones. And companies like Kindred and Sarcos are developing worker exoskeletons that can help handle heavy materials or be remotely operated for inspections.
  • Universal Platforms & Edge Intelligence
    • Universal Platforms — cloud vendors here commonly market themselves as general platform-as-a-service (PaaS) companies that allow other IoT and IIoT companies to manage and maintain the capture of data from their device networks. This includes the mostly industry-agnostic platforms like C3 IoT and Altizon that do cloud analytics for industrial companies.

    • Fog & Edge Computing — computing done at the “edge” or closer to the sensor is a trending shift occurring within the IIoT architecture. Companies like Saguna Networks do edge computing (close to the point of collection), whereas a company like Foghorn Systems does fog computing (think a lower-hanging cloud that’s done on-site like a LAN). Both methods allow mission-critical devices to operate safely without latency of transmitting all data to a cloud, which can also save big on bandwidth.

  • Applied Sensor Networks
    • Fleet — sensor networks and solutions for connected trucking fleets. Companies like Veniam are focused on the connectivity aspect, where others like Vnomics sell optimization and vehicle monitoring technology.
    • Oil & Gas —  companies using connected sensor networks in the oil industry include GroundMetrics (locating wells), Tachyus (extracting oil and gas), and Aptomar (spill safety).
    • Agriculture — companies like Blue River Technology and Farmbot are bringing robotics to agriculture. Others like Farmers Edge and Terravion are about capturing and analyzing farm data and tractor telematics for more efficient production.
    • Smart Grid – startups in this area develop tech that enables more efficient distribution of electricity, gas and water, and often market to utility companies. TrilliantTendril, and BluePillar are smart-meter enabled solutions for utilities and large enterprises to manage usage and reporting.
    • Factory — Eigen Innovations and the companies in this category are more vertical-specific platforms for manufacturing analytics. Eigen, for example, uses video and sensor data on factory floors to ensure process and quality control.
    • Warehouse — robotic movers and RFID sensor systems that target the warehouse. Fetch Robotics, for example, does material transport on warehouse floors. Alien Technologies, one of the most well-funded startups in all of IoT, does RFID tagging tech for the supply chain.
  • Advanced Analytics, Edge Intelligence & Protection
    • AI, ML, Predictive Analytics — software that allows companies to find insights and derive predictive analytics such as when machines will need maintenance. Most companies in the category are like Maana and work by applying AI to mining machine data, but others, like Augury Systems, offer a full sensor suite that detects machine anomalies and offers predictive analytics.
    • Cybersecurity — companies in this category develop cybersecurity solutions for IIoT and industrial control systems (ICS) in heavy industry. The IIoT has already suffered serious hacks; a German steel mill suffered “massive damages” after hackers accessed a blast furnace that workers could not properly shut down. Bastille Networks is one company that focuses on protecting the wireless transmission of IoT and RFID devices, and Claroty is a well-funded company working on protecting industrial control systems.

Full article – can be found here

Funding Platforms New Zealand – Smart City IoT

FUNDING & GROWTH

Angels/VC’s: Seed-stage, series A and beyond investors.

Auckland:

Wellington:

Christchurch:

Other:

New Zealand’s most innovative tech companies named – Hi Tech Awards

The finalists for the 2017 Hi-Tech Awards were announced at simultaneous events in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch on the 29th March.

Entries, which came from as far afield as Kaitaia and Invercargill, were up 30 per cent over last year and Wayne Norrie, chair of the Hi-Tech Trust, said the the standard of entries was also the highest seen.

The finalists will now go into a round of face-to-face judging before the winners are announced at a gala event in Auckland on 12 May..

The finalists are:

PwC Hi-Tech Company of the Year

ARANZ Geo
Invenco
Pushpay Holdings
Serko
Vend
Xero

Coretex Hi-Tech Emerging Company of the Year

Figured
Harmoney
Link Engine Management
SilverStripe
Timely

New Zealand Venture Investment Fund (NZVIF) Hi-Tech Start-Up Company of the Year

AskNicely
Dexibit
Latipay
Performance Lab
Property

IBM Most Innovative Company

Auror
Pushpay
RedShield Security
Simplicity

Callaghan Innovation Maori Innovation Award

Biolytix
Navilluso
Origins Software
Pango Productions

Duncan Cotterill Innovative Hi-Tech Software Product

Auror
Moxion
RedShield Security
Spotlight Reporting

Kiwibank Hi-Tech Innovative Services Award

EROAD
MyBitcoinSaver
Navilluso Medical
RedShield Security
Snowball Effect

Endace Innovative Hi-Tech Hardware Product

Adherium
DARC Technologies
EROAD
Shotover Camera Systems

Quick Circuit Innovative Hi-Tech Mobile Product

beweb
oDocs Eye Care
Motim Technologies

NZTE Innovative Agritech Product

Compac
Figured
PPP Industries
StockX

Xero Hi-Tech Young Achiever

Aleisha Amohia
Jamie Beaton
Kendall Flutey
Aleisha Staples

ATEED Best technology for the Creative Sector

Dexibit
Moxion
Shotover Camera Systems
Shuttlerock

Qual IT Best technology for the Public Sector

Auror
Dexibit
EROAD
Orion Health

Sharing Economy websites in New Zealand

There are a host of websites being developed to help cater for people to people transactions cutting out the traditional more expensive providers.

In New Zealand Uber and Airbnb are getting a lot of traction now but there are dozens of NZ developed sites providing niche services including idle , shareacamper , yourdrive , cityhop and trademe to name just a few.

Rideshare and car-pooling…

Uber – the global ride-share app is available in NZ and Australia. One tap and a car comes directly to you. Hop in—your driver knows exactly where to go. And when you get there, just step out. Payment is completely seamless. Download the Uber app for a free ride on me**

Want to sign up as a driver in NZ? Then click on this link

Uber is a smartphone app that makes it easy to get paid for driving your own car. It’s simple to use. When you want to make money just turn on the app and pick up riders. You’ll see how much you made after every ride and you’ll get paid weekly.

Others to be profiled =  getchariot , Zoomy (Auckland central only)

Holiday rentals , places to stay…

Airbnb – connects travelers with hosts offering unique local experiences and places to stay.

On Airbnb, you can book homes and things to do, or start earning money as a host.

Idle – is an Airbnb property management website.  After every stay , Idle will have your home professionally cleaned. They offer several others services including planning and preparing your property for listing.

Camping , Motorhomes and recreational vehicles (RVs)…

Share a Camper – connect travelers with the whole of New Zealand. From coast to scenic coast

Employment and Internships , full-time and part-time roles…

Internships NZ – established company providing opportunities for those wanting roles in NZ companies.

Car Hire , Hourly rates , CBD locations…

Your Drive – wheels whenever you need them. Hire or rent out a vehicle from a local owner.

cityhop is New Zealand’s first car share company. It is based on the same concept as a car hire company however the major differences are that they have cars parked all over the CBD and members can hire by the hour!

Food delivery…

A growing list of companies who partner with restaurants offering quality food delivery (not just Pizza!)

Urban Sherpa , delivereasy , foodninja , deliveroo

(this post will be added to along with a guide to the whole sharing economy ecosystem in New Zealand).

  • **Free ride amounts varies city by city.

Deloitte Fast 50 -2016 – Pushpay takes number one ranking

deloitte-fast-50-960x271-1

Auckland’s Pushpay, a developer of mobile commerce tools, has taken the number one ranking on this year’s Deloitte Fast 50 with an impressive 4574% growth.

Auckland-based digital customer relationship management platform Plexure (1197% growth), Christchurch house lifter SmartLift Systems (1028%), Wellington brewery Panhead Custom Ales (925%) and Auckland travel company All Blacks Tours (822%) round out this year’s top five.

Digital parking management company Parking Sense was named the 2016 national Rising Star. The Rising Star awards are designed to recognise early-stage, innovative, high potential companies – the next generation of Fast 50 businesses.

The annual Deloitte Fast 50 indexranks businesses experiencing rapid revenue growth over three years across a range of sectors, including manufacturing, technology, services, retail and consumer products, exporters and mature business. The index sets the benchmark for high growth businesses in New Zealand.

The threshold for entry into the Fast 50 was 225%, the highest entry threshold since the inception of the index in 2001, and the top 3 companies all had three-year growth rates in excess of 1000%.

Thirty-eight companies are appearing on the Deloitte Fast 50 for the first time and 27 companies have revenues under $5 million.

A total of 24 companies on the 2016 index are from the Auckland and Upper North Island region, followed by 9 from Christchurch and the Upper South Island, 7 from Wellington and the Lower North Island, 6 from Dunedin and the Lower South Island and 4 from the Central North Island.

Thirteen companies classify themselves as technology companies, twelve are consumer businesses, nine are from the construction industry and four each are from the financial services and tourism industries.

The remaining eight companies on the index are from the agribusiness (2), health (2), energy/utilities (2), education (1) and manufacturing (1) industries.

Deloitte Private partner Bill Hale says the high level of diversity among this year’s Fast 50 companies is similar to last year, underscoring that any type of business, from anyplace in New Zealand, can do well with the right approach.

“This is important as it creates job opportunities across more than just the tech industry, and demonstrates that SME businesses can be successful in their niche with good strategy and good execution,” he says.

“The average 2016 Deloitte Fast 50 business has 33 employees, is just over 6 years old, has annual revenue of $10.3 million and a 482% three-year growth rate.”

Along with being the number one ranked business on the 2016 Deloitte Fast 50, Pushpay took out the national awards for fastest growing exporter and fastest growing technology business.

The third ranked business on the index, SmartLift Systems, won the national award for fastest growing services business and fourth ranked Panhead Custom Ales won the national award for fastest growing manufacturer.

Other national category awards went to fifth ranked All Blacks Tours for fastest growing retail or consumer products business, IFS Forestry for fastest growing agribusiness and BLIS Technologies for fastest growing mature business.

The Deloitte Festival of Fast Growth, held for the fourth time at Auckland’s Villa Maria winery, brings together the country’s fastest growing companies for a one day inspirational business event. The focus of the day is to provide an informal but challenging and thought provoking environment for high growth business. It includes meaningful workshops, networking opportunities and concludes with the celebration to count down the fastest growing companies from 50 to 1.

For the full Deloitte Fast 50 index, go to Fast 50

Pushpay

Pushpay provides mobile commerce tools that facilitate fast, secure and easy non-point of sale payments. After asking “Why isn’t this payment easier to make?”, the Pushpay team answered it themselves with a world-class commerce exchange that’s grown 4574.4%.

Plexure

They’re on a mission to move mobile customers into the real world! Plexure helps brands use connected tech to drive revenue by increasing in-person sales, footfall, guest count, return visits and more.

Teknique

Teknique creates better ways to view, interpret, and understand the world by integrating its smart camera platform technology into electronic products. They are a team of thinkers, tinkerers, doers and communicators, dedicated to product development. They know that creative innovation got them here and are celebrating a growth rate of 607.5%.

IFS Forestry

IFS Forestry focuses on maximising forest owners’ investments. Offering a complete range of forestry services, from planning, forest establishment, and log harvesting, to carbon management and consulting services, they assist investors to get the best out of their forestry investments. Drawing on generations of knowledge in the forestry industry, this company is founded on a dedication to developing strong relationships and an innovative mind set. With 721.3% growth

Facilities Integrate Auckland 2016 , 3 – 4 November 2016, ASB Showgrounds

facilitiesint2016_2-jpg
Facilities Integrate 2016

Facilities Integrate provides a unique showcase for businesses that operate, maintain and upgrade buildings,
facilities and infrastructure, or design, install and integrate AV and ICT systems.

There are some seminars being held which will cover IoT.

Offices and commercial spaces are undergoing a smart transformation connecting and linking HVAC, lighting, environmental sensors, and security and safety equipment, along with external inputs such as the smart grid and weather.

User-driven and automated business processes can now leverage real-time IoT information from people, systems and devices to maximize resource efficiency, reduce cost and risk, and increase visibility across all operations.

Part of solving IoT challenges is to provide a new range of LPWAN enabled sensors for the Smart Metering, Intelligent Building and Smart City market. This new solution will allow building managers to achieve higher comfort, greater energy efficiency in monitoring energy and water consumption.

Facilities management

The event will cover building management, cleaning, energy management, fire protection, grounds care, HVAC, health & safety, maintenance technologies, security, storage, waste management and more.

Systems integration

The event will cover AV system integration, building automation & control, video projection & display, digital Signage, unified communications, audio systems and entertainment and more.

Free Registration

Visitor registration is free prior to the show and gate sales will be $25.00. Sign up to our newsletter for the registrations launch announcement. (use code – Radio) Register here

Technology is now New Zealand’s third-largest export – 2016 TIN100

tin

Technology is now only behind dairy and tourism with exports of $6.87b.

The 2016 TIN100 was released last night and Tech companies’ revenue increased by 12 per cent in the year to June.

The sector, which includes high-tech manufacturing, ICT and biotechnology, reached combined annual revenue of $9.4b up $1b on the previous year.

“The collective export revenues of the 200 largest tech companies are up by 13.5 per cent from last year to nearly $7 billion, while the total number of employees has increased by 7.9 per cent in the past year with nearly 3,000 new jobs created.

These 200 companies now employ almost 40,000 people.”

New Zealand’s technology sector is set to crack $10 billion in revenue next year according to TIN managing director Greg Shanahan, who said 2016 had been the best year he had seen in the industry.

Watch for updates on this site of companies focusing on Smart City and IoT applications.

Star performers in 2015 included businesses like Xero, Fisher&Paykel Healthcare, and Wynyard Group .

2016’s big movers will be updated later this week.